Life thoughts...

This site isn't just about decorating. It's also about how we redesign ourselves as we age. I recently read an article on Psychology Today about how our younger selves can betray our older selves.  I know it's kind of hard to understand, but it goes something like this: you choose a spouse at 25 that you never would choose at 45, commit to a tattoo at 18 that your 36 year old self loathes, or choose a career path in your 20s because it's lucrative yet hate how it sucks your life dry at 50.  When we are young we choose for the young us, not the older version of who we'll become. In a perfect world our spouse or job evolves at the same quality and rate that we do so we stay content along the way.  Sadly, all too often it doesn't happen that way. You get my drift?  The all too frustrating physical body we have is something my younger self betrayed me with. I never learned the discipline of exercise or thinness when I was young, and alas it is as illusive to me now as finding the perfect shoe. Is it only me? Anyone else always on the lookout for a shoe that is just a bit cuter or more comfy than what you already have?  We often say 'if I only knew then what I know now' and rightly so. If I could time travel I would go back and beg my mom to become a jogger and show Little Donna Jo what health looks like! (Oh if you knew my mother you are probably laughing!)  Not that jogging is health, but I desperately wish I had a love for physical activity!  


So...we change as we age. We redesign ourselves to represent the inside us and what our journey has made us to be.  I used to wear way more jewelry when I was young; I think I wanted the attention from being accessorized perfectly and hearing how cute I looked.  Today I wear my wedding ring and sometimes earrings, or an occasional necklace if I'm dressing up. I think I'm less fussy inside and want to be on the outside too, and most often I do not enjoy attention anymore.  The reverse can happen too though. Sometimes we put more on the outside because the inside feels lost or insecure and we hope it will magically make the inside get better. I've done this! We are complex, are we not? I've experienced depression and one of my assigned tasks from my therapist was to put on make-up daily and go out of the house at least once, even just to walk the dogs.  I resisted a bit because I like to save money! Not wearing makeup when I'm not going in public prolongs the life of my makeup! But I complied, and it helped. Surprisingly. I felt more like the real me when I did my hair and make up and put on a bra (tmi). The mirror didn't mock me each time I floated by. So, there is something to this idea that our insides and outsides are complexly connected.  As with a well designed room that makes me feel good to be in it, a well designed exterior me makes me feel good on the inside.  And vice versa. I feel prettier when my insides are right, peaceful, and content. I take this theory into my design world. Chaos and clutter, dingy paint, or worn out furniture in a room doesn't feel good and can affect how you feel about your home, and life in general. Redoing a room can feel like succeeding on a diet: you feel accomplished, proud, and good about your home if you like how it feels and looks. When we take care of our selves and our homes it just feels good, it feels right.